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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
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Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

congruence

The scale measures the extent to which a viewer believes that the role played by a product in a show (TV, movie, play) was pertinent to the story line.

Four Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a product that is advertised within a video game is related in some way to the nature of the game. The items in the current version of the scale were developed for use with a racing game and will need to be modified somewhat for use with other types of games.

The scale is composed of seven, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the perceived level of similarity and fit between brands from two different companies.

The seven item, seven-point semantic differential scale measures the degree to which a person views two entities as being congruent. In the case of Becker-Olson (2003), the scale was used to measure how well a company is representative of a certain industry. In contrast, Simmons and Becker-Olsen (2006) assessed the fit between a firm and a charitable cause.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that an endorser is similar to him/herself.

Seven-point, Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person perceives there to be a relationship between an endorser and a product, such that the pairing of the two is viewed as a "good fit." This measure was referred to as relatedness by Sengupta, Goodstein, and Boninger (1997).

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person's motivation for giving a certain amount of money or time to a cause is a reflection of who he/she is inside rather than being externally-driven.

The degree to which a person identifies with a brand by viewing it as fitting one's personality and lifestyle is measured using five, seven-point Likert-type statements. The scale was called brand equity by Johnson, Herrmann, and Huber (2006).

Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that there is a similarity between a brand's image and his/her own image. Swaminathan, Page, and Gürhan-Canli (2007) referred to the scale as self-concept connection.

The scale is composed of seven Likert-type statements that are intended to measure the degree to which a consumer views there being a similarity and connection between him/her self-image and that of a particular brand.