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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

congruence

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring a person's attitude about a company's reasons for sponsoring an event, the emphasis being on the opinion that the sponsor genuinely has the "best interest" of the event in mind.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent to which a customer views a service provider he/she uses and the image that the provider has as being important to his/her self-concept.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type sentences to assess a person's sense of the similarity between the images of an event and a specified brand that could be associated with it in some way, e.g., sponsorship.

The scale is composed of seven-point Likert type statements measuring a person’s sense of the fit between an event and the organization that is sponsoring it.  The events examined in the reviewed studies were related to sports.

This three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale attempts to assess a person's sense of the extent to which a certain brand is used by participant's in a specific event.

The scale is composed of three items intended to measure the similarity (or lack thereof) between a person's prior beliefs about a brand and some new information he/she has been exposed to.

The scale is composed of nine-items and a five-point response format indicating the degree to which a consumer views a brand as having personality-like characteristics typified by the following facets: reliable, intelligent, and successful.

Three, seven-point, semantic differentials items are used to measure a person's evaluation of the extent to which there is a reasonable relationship between a certain type of business and its involvement in a certain cause or charitable activity.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring a person's attitude about the effect of a company's support for a particular event on one's attitude toward that company. The emphasis is on the degree to which sponsorship could improve one's opinion of the sponsor. The events examined by Speed and Thompson (2000) were related to sports.

Four, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer views the use of some focal brand as more consistent with his or her self-image than some referent brand. The similarity between a consumer's self-concept and the image held of the focal brand is the focus of the scale.