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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

consequences

This three-item, seven-point scale measures how concerned a person is about being embarrassed if he/she reviewed a particular good or service and it was not accepted well by others.  The items are general enough for use with regard to posting product reviews online or privately sharing one’s opinion with friends. 

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s belief that everyone could experience a house fire and, if it occurs, smoke detectors can reduce the damage.

The scale is composed of four, nine-point Likert-type items that measure how much concern and worry a person expresses about how a particular product with a particular attribute will function.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person believes a particular infection is serious.

Four, nine-point Likert-type items measure how vulnerable a person believes it would be to engage in sex given a certain hypothetical context.

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person's belief that unhealthy eating patterns can have serious harmful effects on one's overall health.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person's belief that adhering to particular nutritional guidelines will effectively reduce harmful effects on one's health.

The degree to which a person believes it is likely that a service would not be delivered or provided as expected is measure in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type statements.

The scale measures how bad a person believes the unintended reactions of a health-related good/service could be.  The construct being measured is akin to the consequences component of perceived risk (e.g., Cox 1967; Dowling 1986).  Three, five-point items compose the scale.

The scale measures a consumer’s belief in personal reincarnation and that the universe itself is in a continual cycle.