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The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

consequences

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person feels in control of a choice and takes personal responsibility for the outcome.

This scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the tendency for a person to assume the best will happen and concentrate more on the positive consequences of decisions rather than the negative.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is fixated on the negative consequences of his/her decisions rather than the positive.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person consciously considers potential consequences before making decisions including their likelihood and significance.

This scale uses five items to measure how deceived and exploited a customer of a business feels as a result of some event such as a service failure.

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person believes that a certain product is "public" in the sense that if he/she were to purchase and use it others would be aware of it. DelVecchio and Smith (2005) referred to the scale as social risk - evaluation by others.

The scale is composed of six, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person perceives there to be risk in buying a certain product due to doubt that it will satisfactorily perform the tasks for which it is intended.

The scale has six, seven-point Likert-type statements that are used to measure the degree to which a person perceives there to be chance in loosing money with regards to buying a certain product.

Three statements with a nine-point Likert-type response format are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that the purchase of a specified product involves high performance risk. This means there is doubt that the product will do what is expected.  Given the phrasing of the items, the scale is appropriate when respondents are evaluating the risk of buying a new version of a product verses the "regular" or "standard" version.

The scale is purported to measure the perceived degree of financial risk associated with purchase of a specified product. Financial risk has to do with the uncertainty and monetary loss a person thinks could be incurred if a product does not function at some expected level. Shimp and Bearden (1982) used a three-item, nine-point version of the scale, whereas the version used by Grewel, Gotlieb, and Marmorstein (1994) had three items and a seven-point response format.