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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

consistency

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person's belief that the characteristics of a brand (its perceived benefits or concepts) are shared by a particular brand extension.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.

A consumer's belief that a particular brand extension is consistent with and representative of a parent brand is measured using seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.

The scale measures a person's belief that a particular brand extension has a legitimate connection with the original.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.  Three, seven-point Likert-type statements compose the scale.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's belief that a particular brand extension upholds and perpetuates the unique meaning of the brand.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.

A person's inconsistent attitude toward an object is measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.  Chang (2011) used various versions of the scale to measure two constructs: ambivalence toward "green" products and ambivalence toward buying "green" products.

The amount of similarity between one's self and a person in a story is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

The scale uses three items to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a brand is a symbol of the person he/she wants to be.

The scale is composed of forty-two, six-point Likert-type statements that assess the extent to which a person expresses a need for definite answers rather than ambiguity.

Three Likert-type statements with a seven-point response format are used to assess a consumer's desire to patronize just one retailer within a certain product category. This is in contrast to being a regular customer simply out of routine.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that the parts of a particular stimulus fit together well.