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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

consistency

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person's belief that the characteristics of a brand (its perceived benefits or concepts) are shared by a particular brand extension.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.

A consumer's belief that a particular brand extension is consistent with and representative of a parent brand is measured using seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.

The scale measures a person's belief that a particular brand extension has a legitimate connection with the original.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.  Three, seven-point Likert-type statements compose the scale.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's belief that a particular brand extension upholds and perpetuates the unique meaning of the brand.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.

A person's inconsistent attitude toward an object is measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.  Chang (2011) used various versions of the scale to measure two constructs: ambivalence toward "green" products and ambivalence toward buying "green" products.

The amount of similarity between one's self and a person in a story is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

The scale uses three items to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a brand is a symbol of the person he/she wants to be.

The scale is composed of forty-two, six-point Likert-type statements that assess the extent to which a person expresses a need for definite answers rather than ambiguity.

Three Likert-type statements with a seven-point response format are used to assess a consumer's desire to patronize just one retailer within a certain product category. This is in contrast to being a regular customer simply out of routine.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure the extent of perceived compatibility between the endorser of a product in an advertisement and the brand being featured. With a different scale stem or instructions, the items seem to be amenable for measuring other types of fit, e.g., merger of two companies, a company's sponsorship of a particular event/cause, co-branding of products, etc.