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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

consistency

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person's belief that the characteristics of a brand (its perceived benefits or concepts) are shared by a particular brand extension.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.

A consumer's belief that a particular brand extension is consistent with and representative of a parent brand is measured using seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.

The scale measures a person's belief that a particular brand extension has a legitimate connection with the original.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.  Three, seven-point Likert-type statements compose the scale.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's belief that a particular brand extension upholds and perpetuates the unique meaning of the brand.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.

A person's inconsistent attitude toward an object is measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.  Chang (2011) used various versions of the scale to measure two constructs: ambivalence toward "green" products and ambivalence toward buying "green" products.

The amount of similarity between one's self and a person in a story is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

The scale uses three items to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a brand is a symbol of the person he/she wants to be.

The scale is composed of forty-two, six-point Likert-type statements that assess the extent to which a person expresses a need for definite answers rather than ambiguity.

Three Likert-type statements with a seven-point response format are used to assess a consumer's desire to patronize just one retailer within a certain product category. This is in contrast to being a regular customer simply out of routine.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure the extent of perceived compatibility between the endorser of a product in an advertisement and the brand being featured. With a different scale stem or instructions, the items seem to be amenable for measuring other types of fit, e.g., merger of two companies, a company's sponsorship of a particular event/cause, co-branding of products, etc.