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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

consistency

The scale uses four, five-point items to measure the degree to which an adolescent thinks his/her parents are inconsistent in their restriction of the time he/she can spend with television, movies, and video games that contained too much violence.

The scale uses three, seven-point semantic differentials to measure how well two objects are considered to fit each other and be compatible.

Six, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s desire to experience consistency and stability at the current time rather than change.

Employing four statements, the scale measures the degree to which a customer believes that each part (employee, department, partner) of a particular service provider works “in concert” and as one to smoothly provide service to him/her.

With four items, this scale measures how similar a brand extension is to its parent brand and the appropriateness of launching it.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a brand extension is similar to its parent brand in satisfying the same needs, being used in the same situations, and have common physical features.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a brand extension is consistent with its parent brand, particularly in terms of image.

Using three statements, the scale measures a consumer's belief that the look and feel of shopping-related websites affect the sense of their quality.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to shopping sites in general.

Using three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person views another person as having beliefs that are  consistent with his/her own.

The scale is composed of six statements measuring the utility resulting from the perceived quality and anticipated performance of a particular brand of a product. One way the scale is distinguished from that of a satisfaction scale is that it could be applied at various stages during the purchase decision process whereas satisfaction is usually measured after the decision.