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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

control

The extent to which a person feels a sense of personal control in a particular environment is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a consumer has focused on constraining his/her spending in a particular context is measured with three, seven-point questions.  The purchase context is not explicitly stated in the items and must be stated elsewhere.

The scale has five, five-point items that measure how much a person feels mentally drained and unfocused at the current time. 

Four statements are used to measure the attitude one holds about luck such that it plays an important role in life and favors some people while not others.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer’s belief that he/she has the power to handle and use an object as desired.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the motivation a person has to be free to make his/her own choices and not be controlled.

The scale uses four Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that another person does not legally own a certain item but is engaging in behaviors that seem to signal that he/she does.

This scale has six, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s belief that people can make a new beginning with hope of a better life, despite his/her past or present circumstances.

How much one wants to be in control of his/her life, most particularly his/her job, is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person’s belief that he/she was able to get others to do what was wanted in a certain situation is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.