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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

control

In this scale, three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes a business which provides him/her with some sort of benefits is restrictive in the use of those benefits.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person's evaluation of his/her mental strength at a particular point in time, e.g., while engaged in an experimental task.

The scale measures how likely a person thinks it is that he/she will engage in activities that are part of responsible handling of personal financial matters related to loans, debts, and credit usage.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes there is a low probability of getting a particular disease but, if getting it, having the ability to survive it.

This seven item scale is intended to measure a person’s ability to alter his/her behavior in order to portray an image suited for a social situation.

The degree to which a person believes that fate determines outcomes in life (external locus of control) verses self (internal locus of control) is measured in this scale using six, seven-point items. 

The extent to which a person believes that a particular piece of technology makes it easy to conduct a business activity from home is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The implication is that such transactions were previously only possible in person. Collier and Sherrell (2010) used the scale with a self-service technology (SST) but it appears to be amenable for use in a wider context.

The extent to which a person feels that he/she is in control of some object or process is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  Collier and Sherrell (2010) used the scale with a self-service technology (SST) but it appears to be amenable for use in a wider context.

Using three, seven-point bi-polar phrases, the scale measures whether a person believes something that occurred was under his/her control or, instead,  was caused by the company providing the service.

Five, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's tendency to be self-focused and to scrutinize his/her moods.