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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

cost

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular company spends a lot of money on “socially responsible” activities.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular company spends money on “social responsibility” activities in order to improve its own reputation.

The degree to which a person believes there is a relationship between the healthiness of food and its cost such that healthier foods tend to be more expensive than unhealthy foods is measured with three, seven-point items.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s stated likelihood of challenging an action taken by an organization that he/she disputes and even escalating the issue if necessary.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures some cost-related reasons a consumer has for not installing a particular energy-saving device.

With five short phrases and a seven-point Likert-type response format, the scale measures the extent to which a customer believes a store where an order was placed appears to be convenient to use based on such things as low time and effort ordering costs. 

Composed of four, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a consumer believes he/she has received certain benefits from a provider over time and would lose them if changing providers.

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a consumer believes he/she has spent a lot of time and effort on a relationship with a current provider.

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items and measures how much a consumer believes that if he/she were to change service providers then new policies would have to be learned.

The likelihood of receiving lower service quality if one switches from one provider to another is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.