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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

cost

This three item scale measures a customer's belief that it is not worth changing from the type of checkout he/she has experience with at a store to another form of checkout.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a consumer's beliefs about how often he/she has been at a website ready to make a purchase but decided not to finish the transaction when the costs involved (shipping, sales tax, and total amount) were realized at checkout.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer is sensitive to the "allocative" effects of prices such that buying an expensive product leaves less money for other purchases.

Three, eleven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a product being offered at a certain price would be a worthwhile purchase.

Five, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how a consumer views the fairness and attractiveness of a particular purchase given what is known about the quality of the product versus the cost to get it.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer's attitude toward the price of a product with an emphasis on the extent to which it is viewed as a good deal.

Seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a customer's thoughts regarding the degree of costs (time, money, and effort) that would be associated with changing service providers. Ganesh, Arnold, and Reynolds (2000) referred to their scale as a measure of dependence.

A three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure a consumer's attitude regarding the time and effort perceived to be necessary to shop at a certain store. Baker et al. (2002) referred to the scale as time/effort cost perceptions.

Three, seven-point statements are used to measure a consumer's attitude regarding the monetary costs a company will incur if it has high prices. In the study by Srivastava and Lurie (2004), the "costs" referred to a price matching guarantee that was described in a scenario that subjects read before completing the scale.

Three items are used to measure a consumer's estimate of a product's price.