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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

credibility

The compatibility of a brand and a cause-related organization having some sort of partnership is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Composed of five questions and their respective seven-point responses, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement is trustworthy and unbiased.

The scale has three, seven-point items which measure a person’s disbelief that a particular company is one of the worst ones in its industry as reported by a major consumer organization.  The scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with an actual event.

Using three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes a certain advertisement provides accurate information.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how well organized and easy to understand an ad is which a person has seen.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s attitude regarding the bias and believability of a particular news story to which he/she has been exposed.

Eight, nine-point items are used to measure how much a consumer thinks that a price listed for a certain product is the actual price that will be charged by a particular retailer.

Eight, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person’s attitude about an article with an emphasis on its usefulness and credibility.

The degree to which a person believes that advertising is trustworthy and provides truthful information about products is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.

The extent to which a person not only thinks an advertisement is unbelievable, but that it is also misleading, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point semantic-differentials.