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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

credibility

This six-item scale measures how much a person believes that the writer of a review was honest and accurately described his/her experience with the “product” (broadly defined).

The compatibility of a brand and a cause-related organization having some sort of partnership is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Composed of five questions and their respective seven-point responses, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement is trustworthy and unbiased.

The scale has three, seven-point items which measure a person’s disbelief that a particular company is one of the worst ones in its industry as reported by a major consumer organization.  The scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with an actual event.

Using three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes a certain advertisement provides accurate information.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how well organized and easy to understand an ad is which a person has seen.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s attitude regarding the bias and believability of a particular news story to which he/she has been exposed.

Eight, nine-point items are used to measure how much a consumer thinks that a price listed for a certain product is the actual price that will be charged by a particular retailer.

Eight, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person’s attitude about an article with an emphasis on its usefulness and credibility.

The degree to which a person believes that advertising is trustworthy and provides truthful information about products is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.