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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

credibility

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how well organized and easy to understand an ad is which a person has seen.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s attitude regarding the bias and believability of a particular news story to which he/she has been exposed.

Eight, nine-point items are used to measure how much a consumer thinks that a price listed for a certain product is the actual price that will be charged by a particular retailer.

Eight, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person’s attitude about an article with an emphasis on its usefulness and credibility.

The degree to which a person believes that advertising is trustworthy and provides truthful information about products is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.

The extent to which a person not only thinks an advertisement is unbelievable, but that it is also misleading, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point semantic-differentials.

The ease of comprehending a stimulus such as a message is measured in this scale with seven, seven-point semantic differentials.  The construct is sometimes referred to as fluency.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular story and the facts stated in it are correct is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with advertisements, books, and movies by simply replacing the word "story" in each item with something else if desired.

The scale has three, five-point uni-polar items and measures how important a person believes realism and believability are in evaluating an advertisement's quality.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point items that measure how credible and authentic a particular advertisement is believed to be.