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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

culture

How much a person views a particular social group as important and central to his/her self-image is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point items. 

The scale uses four, seven-point items to measure how much a person has the desire to be around and in touch with things from “home,” however he/she defines it.

The extent to which people experience a feeling that they belong to a different culture than those around them is measured with three, seven-point items.

The strength with which a person expresses favorable attachment to a particular cultural group is measured in this scale using six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person's overall attitude toward a country as well as the products that are made there.

This three item, seven-point semantic-differential scale measures how much a person views a brand as being sold around the world or, at the other extreme, only being consumed in a particular country or region.

Four, seven-point uni-polar items compose the scale and are intended to measure a consumer's overall opinion of the products that are manufactured in a particular country.

The intended construct being measured has to do with a person's general tendency to think either analytically (focus on the parts) or holistically (focus on the whole).  The scale is composed of six, five-point items.

Using ten items, the scale attempts to measure a person's cognitive orientation to either focus on the whole more so than the parts (holistic thinking) or to devote more attention to the parts than to the whole (analytic thinking). 

The degree to which a consumer actively rejects the perceived domestic consumer culture and distances him/herself from it is measured in the scale using six, seven-point Likert-type items.