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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

curiosity

A consumer’s enjoyment of shopping for a variety of related reasons (adventure, novelty, curiosity) is measured with five, five-point Likert-type items.

The four, seven-point unipolar items are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular brand possesses human-like characteristics associated with self-direction and stimulation.

This scale uses four, five-point items to measure the degree to which a consumer likes to shop in stores with pre-owned goods in hopes that something valuable will be found.

The extent to which a person views him/herself as being creative and believes that others think that as well is measured in this scale with three, five-point items.

The scale has been used to measure a type of private introspection and self-attentiveness stimulated by curiosity.  Twelve, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

A four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reports desiring to know more about a specified object. The scale was referred to by Machleit, Allen, and Madden (1993) as brand interest.

This four-item, six-point Likert-type scale is supposed to measure the degree to which a person views a specified activity or experience as being novel and arousing curiosity. This scale was called arousal by Unger (1981; Unger and Kernan 1983) and the activity investigated was subjective leisure. In the study by Guiry, Mägi, and Lutz (2006) the activity was recreational shopping.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's curiosity and fascination with a particular retail business.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person reports wanting to know more about a particular brand after having been exposed to an advertisement about it. The scale was called curiosity by Smith, Chen, and Yang (2008).

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person says that browsing a website stimulated his/her curiosity. The scale was referred to as the curiosity subfactor of a second-order construct that Wang et al. (2007) called flow. While this factor and the others measured by Wang et al. (2007) might be viewed as a set as composing flow, they do not individually appear to measure flow.  Given this, they are not called flow here.