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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

curiosity

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures one’s motivation to increase his/her knowledge and the willingness to change how the “world” is understood.

A consumer’s enjoyment of shopping for a variety of related reasons (adventure, novelty, curiosity) is measured with five, five-point Likert-type items.

The four, seven-point unipolar items are intended to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular brand possesses human-like characteristics associated with self-direction and stimulation.

This scale uses four, five-point items to measure the degree to which a consumer likes to shop in stores with pre-owned goods in hopes that something valuable will be found.

The extent to which a person views him/herself as being creative and believes that others think that as well is measured in this scale with three, five-point items.

The scale has been used to measure a type of private introspection and self-attentiveness stimulated by curiosity.  Twelve, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

A four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reports desiring to know more about a specified object. The scale was referred to by Machleit, Allen, and Madden (1993) as brand interest.

This four-item, six-point Likert-type scale is supposed to measure the degree to which a person views a specified activity or experience as being novel and arousing curiosity. This scale was called arousal by Unger (1981; Unger and Kernan 1983) and the activity investigated was subjective leisure. In the study by Guiry, Mägi, and Lutz (2006) the activity was recreational shopping.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's curiosity and fascination with a particular retail business.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person reports wanting to know more about a particular brand after having been exposed to an advertisement about it. The scale was called curiosity by Smith, Chen, and Yang (2008).