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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

damage

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person expresses the desire to engage in behaviors that would damage a brand as well as stores and employees that sell the product.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s belief that everyone could experience a house fire and, if it occurs, smoke detectors can reduce the damage.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a customer believes that products he/she purchased from a particular online retailer arrived in acceptable condition, with no major damage.

Four statements are used to measure how much concern is expressed by a consumer about the possibility that other shoppers may have touched or damaged a particular package of a product he/she is thinking about buying.

This scale is composed of five, five-point items that are intended to measure the likelihood of a customer reacting to a service failure by expressing his/her anger to the service employee(s) with hostile gestures or threats of violence.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which the respondent is personally familiar with returning products to the place they were purchased after the products had been used and/or broken. Although not explicitly stated in the scale items, the implication is that it was improper to take the products back given that the use and/or damage to the products was the fault of the buyer, not the seller.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person's attitude about the financial consequences of customers returning products that have been used and/damaged. The implication is that it is improper to take products back if the use and/or damage to the products was the fault of the buyers, not the sellers but that people vary in the extent to which they believe the practice does significant financial damage to a business.