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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

deals

Six Likert-type statements are used to measure a consumer's opinion of how good a deal is for a certain product at a certain price. The emphasis of several items is that the price is lower than expected given one's knowledge of what is being charged elsewhere.

Five statements are used to measure the benefits above and beyond the core service performance that a consumer perceives receiving as a result of having a long-term relationship with a service provider. In particular, this scale is distinguished from two others also tapping into relational benefits (Confidence and Social) by focusing on customization and economic benefits one receives by having a relationship with a specific service firm. This version of the scale used a six-point, Likert-type response format. Another version of the scale used the same items but with different directions (provided below) to measure the importance of this benefit. The anchors for that version were very unimportant and very important.

The frequency with which a consumer gathers coupons for national brands as well as information from store flyers about national brands before going shopping is measured using four, five-point statements.

This six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a consumer's fondness for purchasing products that come with another item for free. This measures a general interest in the promotion rather than the likelihood that the behavior occurs for any particular product category. Lichtenstein, Burton, and Netemeyer (1997) and Lichtenstein, Netemeyer, and Burton (1995) referred to the scale as free-gift-with-purchase proneness and Burton et al. (1998) called it free gift proneness.

This six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a consumer's tendency to buy the brands that are on sale. This measures a general tendency rather than the likelihood that the behavior occurs for any particular product category. Given this, Lichtenstein and colleagues (1993, 1995, 1997; Burton et al. 1998, 1999) referred to the scale as sale proneness.

Three statements with a Likert-type response format are used to measure a consumer's attitude about a specific sales promotion device, the emphasis being on the belief that the deal results in a monetary savings.

Three statements are used to measure a consumer's attitude about a specific sales promotion device he/she is familiar with. The scale was referred to as overall evaluation of the promotion by Chandon, Wansink and Laurent (2000) and does not focus on a specific aspect of the tactic as do the other scales they developed.

The scale uses three Likert-type statements to measure a consumer's attitude about a specific sales promotion technique, the emphasis being on the belief that taking advantage of the promotion would make one feel good and responsible. The scale was called the value expression benefit by Chandon, Wansink and Laurent (2000).

The scale is composed of three Likert-type statements intended to measure a consumer's attitude about a specific sales promotion tactic, the emphasis being on the fun and enjoyment that can come from it.

Three Likert-type statements are used to measure a consumer's attitude about a specific sales promotion technique, the emphasis being on the role played by the promotion in helping to satisfy the desire to try new products and brands.