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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

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The scale has three Likert-type statements that measure a consumer's attitude about a specific sales promotion tactic, the emphasis being on the belief that the promotion reduces search and decision costs.

Five, ten-point semantic differentials composed the scale used by Huff and Alden (1998). The scale was used to measure a consumer's attitude toward sweepstakes in general.

Five, ten-point semantic differentials composed the scale used by Huff and Alden (1998). The scale was used to measure a consumer's attitude toward coupons in general.

Four items are employed to measure the perceived value of a deal given a certain product offered at a certain price. All of the studies employed seven-point response formats except Burton and Lichtenstein (1988; Lichtenstein and Bearden 1989) who used nine-point scales.

The degree to which a consumer describes him- or herself as engaging in behavior related to the collection and use of grocery coupons is measured using six, seven-point items .

The four-item, five-point Likert-type scale is purported to capture the gratification a consumer derives from collecting and redeeming coupons.

Eight, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's interest in the collection and use of coupons. The scale was called attitudes toward couponing by Tat and Bejou (1994).

A three-item, five-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes that a discount is to be used only by those of a specified age group (e.g., senior citizens). The scale was referred to by Tepper (1994) as age segmentation cue manipulation check.

A three-item scale is used to measure a consumer's intention to use a specific discount in a particular purchase context.

This five-item, five-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes a certain discount represents a bona fide reduction in the normal price of a product.