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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

deception

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes it is okay to give misleading or incomplete personal information to a company and that he/she is likely to do it.

With four, nine-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that one or more employees of a company engaged in improper activity that deceived and harmed clients.

Four, nine-point items compose the scale which measures the extent to which a person believes an employee of a company has done something that is either immoral and damaging to his/her company or, at the other extreme, was honest and helpful.

The degree to which a person feels disrespected and betrayed due to a company’s customer data activities is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure how much a person believes some entity is honest and not manipulative.  The focus of the measure is commonly a person, but the scale is general enough to be used with other entities such as a company, an ad, or a website. 

Using four, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the honesty and ethicality of something.  The scale is general in the sense that it appears that it can be applied to a particular person or a group of people.  While it might be used to evaluate the trustworthiness of non-human entities (ads, organizations), it seems most suited for people.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s belief that he/she has been misled and taken advantage of by another party.

The degree to which a person has negative beliefs about advertising in general is measured with five, five-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses four statements to measure a customer’s belief that a particular service provider does not exploit or deceive him/her in their business relationship.

The degree to which a person believes that advertising is trustworthy and provides truthful information about products is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.