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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

deception

The scale uses four Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that another person does not legally own a certain item but is engaging in behaviors that seem to signal that he/she does.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that another person is attempting to mislead others by presenting an image of him/herself that is not true.

The scale uses seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s belief that an advertisement misleads people with its claims and implications about a particular product’s environmentally-related attributes.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes it is okay to give misleading or incomplete personal information to a company and that he/she is likely to do it.

With four, nine-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that one or more employees of a company engaged in improper activity that deceived and harmed clients.  WARNING: The article in which this scale was reported has been retracted by the second author due to anomilies in the data and analyses [Journal of Consumer Research (2020), 47 (4), 632]. The extent to which the anomilies affected this scale is unknown.

Four, nine-point items compose the scale which measures the extent to which a person believes an employee of a company has done something that is either immoral and damaging to his/her company or, at the other extreme, was honest and helpful.  WARNING: The article in which this scale was reported has been retracted by the second author due to anomilies in the data and analyses [Journal of Consumer Research (2020), 47 (4), 632]. The extent to which the anomilies affected this scale is unknown.

The degree to which a person feels disrespected and betrayed due to a company’s customer data activities is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure how much a person believes some entity is honest and not manipulative.  The focus of the measure is commonly a person, but the scale is general enough to be used with other entities such as a company, an ad, or a website. 

Using four, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the honesty and ethicality of something.  The scale is general in the sense that it appears that it can be applied to a particular person or a group of people.  While it might be used to evaluate the trustworthiness of non-human entities (ads, organizations), it seems most suited for people.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s belief that he/she has been misled and taken advantage of by another party.