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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

decision

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures how important a product feature is to a consumer’s evaluation of a particular product and the decision about it.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure one’s tendency to make decisions and to buy impulsively with regard to a specific good or service.

A consumer’s general tendency to make purchases without planning and control is measured with six items.

The importance a consumer places on having friends or family available when shopping to discuss, listen, and offer support in the purchase decision process is measured with six, seven-point items.

The importance of the brand to a consumer's purchase decision is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The focus is on the extent to which the consumer takes the brand of a product into account.  Further, the scale is meant to be used within a product category rather than across all categories since the relevance of brand names in a person's decision could vary from category to category.

The scale is intended to measure the role played by brand name in lowering the risk a consumer perceives in making a purchase decision.  Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.  The scale is meant to be used within a product category rather than across all categories since a brand's role in reducing risk could legitimately vary from category to category.

The motivation a shopper felt to buy a product immediately because of its scarcity is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

Five, five point Likert-type statements are used to measure the level of decision-making involvement a patient believes him/herself to have had in a recent visit to a physician.

Four, seven-point statements are used to measure the importance of a particular voting decision to a person and the degree to which he/she is concerned about the decision.

The three-item semantic differential scale measures the degree of importance a specified product characteristic has to a consumer in a choice context. Sujan and Bettman (1989) used it for attributes of 35mm SLR cameras while Desai and Keller (2002) applied it to the scent attribute of laundry detergents.