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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

decision

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures how important a product feature is to a consumer’s evaluation of a particular product and the decision about it.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure one’s tendency to make decisions and to buy impulsively with regard to a specific good or service.

A consumer’s general tendency to make purchases without planning and control is measured with six items.

The importance a consumer places on having friends or family available when shopping to discuss, listen, and offer support in the purchase decision process is measured with six, seven-point items.

The importance of the brand to a consumer's purchase decision is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The focus is on the extent to which the consumer takes the brand of a product into account.  Further, the scale is meant to be used within a product category rather than across all categories since the relevance of brand names in a person's decision could vary from category to category.

The scale is intended to measure the role played by brand name in lowering the risk a consumer perceives in making a purchase decision.  Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.  The scale is meant to be used within a product category rather than across all categories since a brand's role in reducing risk could legitimately vary from category to category.

The motivation a shopper felt to buy a product immediately because of its scarcity is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

Five, five point Likert-type statements are used to measure the level of decision-making involvement a patient believes him/herself to have had in a recent visit to a physician.

Four, seven-point statements are used to measure the importance of a particular voting decision to a person and the degree to which he/she is concerned about the decision.

The three-item semantic differential scale measures the degree of importance a specified product characteristic has to a consumer in a choice context. Sujan and Bettman (1989) used it for attributes of 35mm SLR cameras while Desai and Keller (2002) applied it to the scent attribute of laundry detergents.