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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

decision-making

Five, five-point items measure a person’s belief that, with respect to heterosexual couples, one gender tends to dominate food-related decisions while the other is more dependent.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person actively participated in a particular decision-making process with another person and, afterward, felt accountable for the decision that was made.

How much a person prefers not to make decisions related to a certain domain is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

With four items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that his/her decisions involving a particular domain of information are made well and easy to make. 

The extent to which a person believes he/she has what it takes to make wise financial decisions, especially with respect to investments, is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Five, seven-point items are used to measure whether information about the stock level or the sales level of two comparable products is the better indicator for making a purchase decision.

Five Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person experiences a feeling of well-being with respect to a particular choice he/she has made.  Two slightly different versions of the scale are provided: one that allows for comparison of two decision options and another version that focuses on just one option.

The degree of certainty a person has in the appropriateness of a particular choice in which one option was selected over another one (explicitly stated) is measured in this five-item Likert scale.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how difficult a person believes it would be for him/her to make a particular choice.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how much a person viewed the goal of a particular choice he/she made being gratification seeking rather than avoiding indulgence.