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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

decision-making

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a person (a parent) believes that children should be free to candidly express their own views and disagreements with parents when they feel like it. This scale was called encouraging verbalization by Schaefer and Bell (1958).

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are intended to measure a person's (e.g., former student's) evaluation of the decision made several years previous regarding a university to attend.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer reports being familiar with a particular buying situation.

Twenty, seven-point Likert-type statements are purported to assess a person's natural disposition to use either a rational or an intuitive decision-making style (DMS). A rational DMS involves thoughtfully attending to information, whereas an intuitive DMS amounts to relying on general feelings or simple heuristic rules as the basis for a decision.

This four-item, six-point scale is purported to measure the relative influence a consumer perceives to have had on the first stage of the decision process for a recent purchase compared with the total contribution made by the other members of the family living in the home. The scale was apparently used twice by Beatty and Talpade (1994): once for the sample (teens) to evaluate relative contributions in a decision regarding a durable product for teenager use and another time related to a durable product for family use.

Five, six-point items are used to measure the relative influence a consumer perceives to have had on the search or decision stages for a recent purchase compared with the total contribution made by the other members of the family living in the home. The scale was apparently used twice by Beatty and Talpade (1994): once for the sample (teens) to evaluate relative contributions in a decision regarding a durable product for teenager use and another time related to a durable product for family use.

This three-item, seven-point semantic differential rating scale is used to measure the degree of importance a person places on a purchase decision for some product and the amount of attention devoted to it.