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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

decision-making

The four-item, seven-point ratings scale is used to measure the degree of involvement a person reports having with a particular decision-making activity.

A four-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person communicates with friends before deciding what to buy. The scale was developed for use with teenagers but appears to be amenable for use with other age groups, though some retesting may be necessary.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer's perceived knowledge of brands in a specified product category as well as the confidence to make purchase decisions and give advice to others about the product class.

Seven, five-point, Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person expresses the need to have friends' approval of where and what he/she buys. The scale was developed for use with teenagers but appears to be amenable for use with other age groups, though some testing may be necessary.

The seven-item, seven-point scale assesses a person's understanding of cars, with particular emphasis on having familiarity with the purchase process.

Three, five-point, Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person (child, teenager) describes seeking information and advice from his/her parents before making purchase decisions.

A three-item, Likert-type scale is used to measure a person's description of his/her intention in a recently completed consumption-related choice activity to select the best product alternative among those available.

The five-item, five-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a child describes his/her parents as determining where, when, and what he/she buys.

This three-item, seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure the probability that a consumer would base his/her purchase decision on his/her relevant past experiences. The measure was referred to by Murray (1985) as past personal experience.

A five-item scale is used to measure the degree to which a person describes one's self as having more influence over family decision-making than one's spouse. It is a global measure because it is not specific to any one type of decision. Responses were recorded on a 100-point constant sum scale for each item. The 100 points are to be divided between oneself and one's spouse to represent relative influence in the relationship over family decisions.