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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

decision-making

The belief that a choice one is making is self-determined rather than being externally imposed is measured in this scale with five, nine-point Likert-type items. Botti and McGill (2011) referred to the measure as personal causality.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the probability that a person will request information at a particular website regarding its services after having taken a look at some of its pages.

The degree to which a consumer reports having had difficulty making a recent decision, possibly to the point of being confused and overwhelmed, is measured in this scale with three, nine-point items.

The problem a consumer has distinguishing between brands in a product category and choosing one of them is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This three item, seven-point scale measures a consumer's ease of making purchases within a product category because of his/her established, prepurchase preference.

The basis on which a person thinks a decision was made is measured in this five-item, seven-point scale. Essentially, the scale attempts to measure the relative roles played by affect and cognition in a particular decision a person has made.

The four-item, seven-point ratings scale is used to measure the degree of involvement a person reports having with a particular decision-making activity.

A four-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person communicates with friends before deciding what to buy. The scale was developed for use with teenagers but appears to be amenable for use with other age groups, though some retesting may be necessary.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer's perceived knowledge of brands in a specified product category as well as the confidence to make purchase decisions and give advice to others about the product class.

Seven, five-point, Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person expresses the need to have friends' approval of where and what he/she buys. The scale was developed for use with teenagers but appears to be amenable for use with other age groups, though some testing may be necessary.