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The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

decision-making

Three items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that it is easy to determine before shopping at a particular retailer if it has what is being looked for.

The scale uses three, seven-point semantic differentials to measure the degree of doubt a consumer has experienced with regard to a recent decision he/she has made.

Five, nine-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person was concerned and worried during a recent purchase decision that he/she would later determine that the selected product was not the best choice. This scale appears to be akin to aspects of post-purchase dissonance.

This scale uses three items to measure the degree to which a person expresses an understanding of their product/brand preference and can explain it.  The scale was called understanding of preference by Kramer (2007).

Three, nine-point items are used to measure a consumer's level of concern about the consequences of the choice being made in a particular purchase decision. The scale was called PDI (product-decision involvement) by Mittal (1989) and Kim and Morris (2009).

The scale is composed of phrases that measure the cognitive effort a person believes was expended in processing a message or a decision.

The scale is composed of three, six-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person expresses having difficulty making a decision. The scale was called perceived ambiguity by Kardes et al. (2007).

The scale is composed of three items that measure the extent to which one party of a married couple felt involved in a particular decision with his/her spouse and believes the process used in making the decision was appropriate.

Three statements are used in this scale to measure the degree to which one party of a marriage believes that the outcome of a particular decision the two made was acceptable and appropriate.

This scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the tendency for a person to assume the best will happen and concentrate more on the positive consequences of decisions rather than the negative.