You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

decision-making

The scale is composed of three, six-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person expresses having difficulty making a decision. The scale was called perceived ambiguity by Kardes et al. (2007).

The scale is composed of three items that measure the extent to which one party of a married couple felt involved in a particular decision with his/her spouse and believes the process used in making the decision was appropriate.

Three statements are used in this scale to measure the degree to which one party of a marriage believes that the outcome of a particular decision the two made was acceptable and appropriate.

This scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the tendency for a person to assume the best will happen and concentrate more on the positive consequences of decisions rather than the negative.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is fixated on the negative consequences of his/her decisions rather than the positive.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person consciously considers potential consequences before making decisions including their likelihood and significance.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer simplifies the buying process by using less extensive information processing and greater reliance on easily available diagnostic cues. Völckner (2008) referred to the scale as need for simplification of cognitive tasks.

Three, nine-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person is sure that, during a recent purchase experience, the product that was selected met his/her needs.

The three item, nine-point Likert-type scale measures the relative ease a consumer experienced in selecting one product from among several and confidence that the decision could be explained to someone who questioned it. The scale was called justifiability by Heitmann, Lehmann, and Herrmann (2007).

One version of the scale uses four, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a recent choice made by consumer was strongly influenced by feelings (affect). A very similar set of items measured the degree to which a choice was feature-based (cognitive). These two scales were referred to as the affective choice index and feature choice index, respectively, by Darke, Chattopadhyay, and Ashworth (2006).