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decision-making

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is fixated on the negative consequences of his/her decisions rather than the positive.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person consciously considers potential consequences before making decisions including their likelihood and significance.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer simplifies the buying process by using less extensive information processing and greater reliance on easily available diagnostic cues. Völckner (2008) referred to the scale as need for simplification of cognitive tasks.

Three, nine-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person is sure that, during a recent purchase experience, the product that was selected met his/her needs.

The three item, nine-point Likert-type scale measures the relative ease a consumer experienced in selecting one product from among several and confidence that the decision could be explained to someone who questioned it. The scale was called justifiability by Heitmann, Lehmann, and Herrmann (2007).

One version of the scale uses four, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a recent choice made by consumer was strongly influenced by feelings (affect). A very similar set of items measured the degree to which a choice was feature-based (cognitive). These two scales were referred to as the affective choice index and feature choice index, respectively, by Darke, Chattopadhyay, and Ashworth (2006).

The scale is composed of Likert-type items intended to measure a shopping orientation characterized by a lack of certainty about where to shop and what to buy due to the great abundance of options. The scale was referred to as confused by overchoice by Shim and Gehrt (1996) and product overload by Heitmann, Lehmann, and Herrmann (2007).

Five, nine-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the choice difficulty and level of time/effort expended during a recent purchase decision. The scale was referred to as evaluation costs by Heitmann, Lehmann, and Herrmann (2007).

Four statements are used to measure a person's beliefs regarding the helpfulness of information provided at a website. The scale was called information content perceptions by Montoya-Weiss, Voss, and Grewal (2003).

Four, seven-point statements are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular store provides sufficient information about a product category so that a decision can be made of what/where to buy.