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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

decision-making

Three statements with a Likert-type response format are used to measure how easy it is to know before going to a particular store that it will have what is needed. Seiders et al. (2005) referred to the scale as decision convenience.

Six Likert-type statements are used to measure one's familiarity with the persuasion tactics used by marketers to sell products and having confidence in his/her ability to deal with those tactics.

The scale is composed of four, nine-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person views the purchase of a particular product in the next year to have unspecified negative consequences associated with it.

The scale is composed of three, ten-point statements measuring the degree to which a person wishes a decision he/she made could be changed and how much happiness the change would bring.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure how important and useful something is to a consumer. As used by Miyazaki, Grewal, and Goodstein (2005), the scale was meant to measure a product attribute's salience to a consumer in an evaluation task. However, it appears the items are generic enough to be used in a variety of contexts.

The scale is composed of three statements measuring the extent to which a person believes a decision that has been made makes sense and is easy to support.

The three item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a voter's confidence in his/her ability to make a "good" choice in an upcoming election.

Four, seven-point statements are used to measure the degree of importance a consumer places on going to several stores before making a final decision about where to buy some certain product.

The scale is composed of four, nine-point semantic differentials intended to measure the degree to which a person describes making a choice between brands in a certain product category as being challenging and requiring great mental effort.

The scale is composed of three, eleven point statements assessing the extent to which a person reports having mixed feelings in making some evaluation.  As written, the items relate to a product evaluation but they seem to be amenable for adaptation to other types of evaluations.