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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

demonstrations

The degree to which a person felt involved in an activity rather than just passively observing it is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  While the scale was made for use in a product demonstration context, it appears to be amenable for use in other contexts where people can either actively participate in something or just watch.   

The degree to which a person believes that a game has effectively communicated information about a particular featured product is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.   

This three-item, seven-point Likert-like scale can be used to measure the likelihood that a consumer would base his/her purchase decision on first-hand experiences with the product. The measure was referred to by Murray (1985) as direct observation/trial.

Three statements are used to measure the importance placed by a viewer on positive comments and endorsements of a product made by users and experts. The scale was called comments and demonstrations by Agee and Martin (2001) and referred to the importance of this type of information being provided in infomercials.

Six, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a viewer has a positive attitude about a particular infomercial. The scale was called advertising effectiveness by Agee and Martin (2001).