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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

design

With three, seven-point Likert items, the scale measures how much a consumer likes the design of a product because it fits with his/her preferences.

Three, seven-point Likert items are used to measure how visually attractive and appealing a product’s design is considered to be.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure a customer’s overall attitude toward the design of a particular retailer’s website.

The degree to which a person believes a particular website has interactive features which allow him/her to customize information is measured in this Likert scale with three, five-point items.

Three, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale and are used to measure the degree to which a person believes the assortment of products available at a particular website is adequate for what he/she is interested in buying.

With three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular website has a visually pleasing design.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s attitude about the adequacy of the information provided at a particular website to meet his/her needs.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a customer believes activities relating to the purchasing process at a particular website are easily accomplished.

The degree to which a person believes the text at a particular website is easy to read and understand is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes a particular product part is an integral feature of a product.  To be clear, the scale measures how much a component is considered to be a defining feature of the product rather than how important the component is to a consumer’s decision.