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I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

diet

Nine items are used to measure how much a person engages in eating-related behaviors meant to control one’s weight.

A person's belief that he/she has the ability to adhere to specific dietary guidelines is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which people regulate their food intake to maintain or lose weight is measured with ten items.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person was thinking about the immediate health-related consequences of using the product featured in the ad he/she was watching.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure the extent to which a person reports that he/she was thinking about the long-term health-related consequences of using the product featured in an ad just watched.

The degree to which a person believes that he/she will suffer physically if he/she has unhealthy eating patterns is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person's belief that adhering to particular nutritional guidelines will effectively reduce harmful effects on one's health.

The level of knowledge and personal experience a person reports having with dieting is measured in this scale using ten items with a seven-point response format.

Four, six-point items are used in the scale to measure how often a person engages in dietary control behaviors, particularly those that limit the intake of calories, sugar, and fat. 

How much a person consciously attempts to control his/her food intake is measured in this scale with six, five-point items.