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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

difficulty

With four items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that his/her decisions involving a particular domain of information are made well and easy to make. 

A person’s belief that he/she is supported emotionally and physically in good times and bad is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The source of the support is not stated in the items.

How complex and time-consuming a task is considered to be is measured with three, seven-point Likert items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how difficult a person believes it would be for him/her to make a particular choice.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a shopper believes that a store’s layout and arrangement of shelves make it difficult to find desired products.

The degree of difficulty a person expresses in choosing one brand from among several in a product category is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

A person’s beliefs about the degree to which he/she is prone to changing attitudes or having them changed is measured with sixteen, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how easy and understandable a person believes a particular in-store shopping technology would be to use.  As currently phrased, the items are stated hypothetically because the respondent has only read about the technology.  The sentences could be easily changed to measure a shopper’s actual experience with the technology.

This Likert scale measures a person’s admission that he/she was easily influenced by the message in a particular ad and had difficulty resisting it.  A seven- and a four-item version are discussed.  Although the scale was made for use with ads, it can be easily modified for use with other types of presentations such as political speeches, religious sermons, educational lectures, movies, etc.

Six, seven-point semantic differentials measure the ease with which some particular written information was read and processed.