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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

displays

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures how large or small an object is perceived to be.  The scale is considered general because it appears like it could be used for evaluating a wide variety of stimuli.

This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how informative and useful the site is, especially with respect to merchandising the products.

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree of importance that various information sources, mainly in-store influences, have to a person when shopping for a certain product.

Six, seven-point bipolar adjectives measure the degree to which a consumer perceives a store to have helpful employees and service. The scale was referred to by Dickson and MacLachlan (1990) as personnel.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer's attitude about end-of-aisle displays and the tendency to buy products displayed on them. This measures a general interest in displays rather than the likelihood that the behavior occurs for any particular product category. Lichtenstein, Burton, and Netemeyer (1997) and Lichtenstein, Netemeyer, and Burton (1995) referred the scale as end-of-aisle-display proneness whereas Burton et al. (1998) called it display proneness.

Three, seven-point items measure the degree to which a consumer describes his or her tendency to search for several types of in-store promotions when shopping for grocery products. The scale was called looking for in-store promotions by Putrevu and Ratchford (1997).