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The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

donate

The scale is composed of four, seven-point items that measure the likelihood that a person will donate a product of his/hers that is not used anymore but could still be useful to someone else.

Three items are used to measure a person’s motivation to look for and gather items he/she owns that are not used anymore and could be donated.  The scale seems to make most sense to use when there has been an appeal of some sort that asked potential donors to think about things of theirs that could be given away.

Three, seven-point items measure a person’s self-expressed likelihood of engaging in consumption behaviors over some period of time that are thought to benefit people in the local area.

The likelihood that a person will engage in consumption behaviors over some period of time that are believed to benefit people in another country is measured with four, seven-point items.

The scale measures the degree to which a consumer experiences conflict with regard to purchasing a discounted product linked with a charity.  The conflict is between personally benefitting by saving money and doing something purely to help the charity.  Three, eleven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

A person’s concern for people in need and the importance placed on personally helping them is measured with five, seven-point items.

Six, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that those in his/her important reference groups (friends, family, co-workers) would approve if he/she donated to charities to help improve social equality.

Five items with a 100 point response scale measure the strength of a person’s belief that his/her donation to a particular charity will help recipients, with an emphasis on improving their social status.

With two- and three-item versions, the scale measures a person’s belief that donating money to charities has a positive effect on one’s happiness.

Rather than focusing on guilt-related feelings, this scale uses four items to measure a person's cognitive appraisal of his/her failure to donate responsibly.