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Three, seven-point items compose the scale and measure how much a customer believes his/her best interests are guiding a particular salesperson’s efforts to solve one’s problem.

The scale has seven, seven-point items that are intended to measure a person’s ability to engage in behaviors with a “partner” that are likely to benefit their relationship.

The importance a person places on engaging in behaviors with a “partner” that are likely to benefit a relationship is measured with seven, seven-point items.

The degree to which a customer believes a particular salesperson tried to understand his/her needs with the best of intentions is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items measuring a customer’s belief that a salesperson tried to relate to him/her as a person and discussed other things than just the purchase.

The seven item, five-point Likert-type scale assesses the degree to which a person describes his/her style of interaction with a physician as being characterized by a two-way flow of information.

This twenty-four-item, six-point scale measures the degree to which a consumer perceives that salespeople engage in behaviors aimed at increasing long-term customer satisfaction rather than have low concern for customer's needs. The scale could be viewed as a measure of consumers' attitudes toward salespeople in general, but the emphasis is certainly on whether salespeople are focused most on making sales or on satisfying customer needs.

Twenty-four items in six subscales use a nine-point response format to measure the degree to which a consumer perceives that a particular salesperson engaged in behaviors that reflected sincere concern for the customer´s needs rather than just trying to make a sale.

This seven-item, five-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a customer perceived a salesperson to have been friendly and helpful. Williams and Spiro (1985) viewed this scale as measuring the interaction-oriented dimension of customer communication style, which stresses enjoyment and maintenance of personal relationships to the possible extent of ignoring the task at hand.

Five, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer perceives a salesperson to have greater interest in self than in the customer. Williams and Spiro (1985) viewed this scale as measuring the self-oriented dimension of customer communication style, which stresses a lack of empathy and interest in self more than others.