You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

dyads

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the extent to which a person actively participated in a particular decision-making process with another person and, afterward, felt accountable for the decision that was made.

One’s attitude regarding how much he/she liked a person with whom he/she worked with in a particular joint task and the willingness to work with that person again is measured with three, seven-point items.

How much a person is interested in learning more about another individual, being closer to him/her, and becoming his/her friend is measured with nine, seven-point items.

Three, seven-point items compose the scale and measure how much a customer believes his/her best interests are guiding a particular salesperson’s efforts to solve one’s problem.

The scale has seven, seven-point items that are intended to measure a person’s ability to engage in behaviors with a “partner” that are likely to benefit their relationship.

The importance a person places on engaging in behaviors with a “partner” that are likely to benefit a relationship is measured with seven, seven-point items.

The degree to which a customer believes a particular salesperson tried to understand his/her needs with the best of intentions is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items measuring a customer’s belief that a salesperson tried to relate to him/her as a person and discussed other things than just the purchase.

The seven item, five-point Likert-type scale assesses the degree to which a person describes his/her style of interaction with a physician as being characterized by a two-way flow of information.

This twenty-four-item, six-point scale measures the degree to which a consumer perceives that salespeople engage in behaviors aimed at increasing long-term customer satisfaction rather than have low concern for customer's needs. The scale could be viewed as a measure of consumers' attitudes toward salespeople in general, but the emphasis is certainly on whether salespeople are focused most on making sales or on satisfying customer needs.