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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

education

The scale uses three semantic differentials to measure how smart a person is subjectively judged to be.  The emphasis is on learning and grades, thus, is most suited for use with students.  As used by Fisher and Ma (2014), the judgement is made regarding someone else rather than oneself.

This scale is composed of four bipolar adjectives with a seven-point response format measuring a consumer's opinion of a store's social status on the basis of the occupation, dwelling area, family income, and education level of those who are thought to shop there.

This three-item, nine-point scale is used to measure a person's socio-economic position on the basis of the following self-reported characteristics: dwelling area, family income, and education.

Six, seven-point Likert-type statements measure the degree to which a person thinks the professors working for an educational institution are helpful to students.

The degree to which a person thinks the professors working for an educational institution are sensitive and concerned about their students' needs is measured with a five-item, seven-point Likert-type scale.

This 11-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring the degree to which a person thinks the professors working for an educational institution engage in various specified activities that help ensure a high-quality education to students.

This six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks the professors working for an educational institution are responsible and can be depended on to do what they promise to do.

A seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring the degree to which a person thinks an educational institution has grounds, buildings, equipment, and professors that are neat and clean.

The scale is composed of six, five-point Likert-type items that measure a student's degree of satisfaction with a class he/she recently took.

This six-item scale measures the degree to which a person indicates an inclination to recommend a business school to others. The scale appears to be intended for a current student of a MBA program.