You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

efficiency

Using six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that consuming a particular product or brand would help attain some of his/her life goals. 

The degree to which a consumer believes that a specific object, person, or service improves his/her accomplishment of shopping-related activity is measured with four, seven-point, Likert-type items.

A consumer’s tendency to go shopping only when something is needed and buy just what is needed is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The perceived level of proficiency and resourcefulness of some object is measured in this scale using seven-point items.  A three, a four, and a five-item version of the scale are discussed.

Using eight uni-polar adjectives, this scale is intended to measure the theorized dimension of personality having to do with the degree to which a person has a tendency to seek efficiency and structure.

The scale uses three semantic differentials to measure the degree to which a stimulus is perceived to be efficient and informative.

The scale is composed of nine, seven-point Likert-type statements intended to measure the degree to which a person is concerned about time and engages in behaviors to manage its efficient usage.

The scale has seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person values his/her time and manages it efficiently.

The scale is composed of 15 Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person expresses a tendency to put off doing things that need to be done and not being diligent in meeting deadlines. At a deeper psychological level, work with the scale has led the experts to believe it measures "procrastinatory behavior motivated by an avoidance strategy to protect one's self-esteem" (Ferrari, Johnson, and McCown 1995, p. 66).

A person's attitude regarding the extent of control he/she has over "transactions" conducted on a mobile device is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type statements. As used by Kleijnen, de Ruyter, and Wetzels (2007), the scale related to banking and brokerage activities but the items appear to be amenable for use with a wider range of negotiations and purchases.