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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

effort

How much effort a participant put into a study and how interesting he/she considered it to be is measured with four, seven-point items.

How complex and time-consuming a task is considered to be is measured with three, seven-point Likert items.

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures how much time and thought a person believes another person put into writing a product review.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure how much effort a person put into a particular task as well as how relevant it was.

Five, seven-point items measure how much cognitive effort a person put into reading some information.  

Five, seven-point Likert-type items were used to measure how much a person notices and values the effort expended by a person or company to produce an object.  To be clear, the scale measures a general attitude about things that are made rather than being specific to a particular producer or product.

The scale measures the degree to which a person views a particular activity as being like a chore and requiring effort to do.  Two- and three-item versions have been tested as have versions with slightly different items.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person believes a particular choice process required some effort yet was fun.

Five unipolar items with a Likert-type response format measure the extent of effort and time invested by a consumer in a specific product assembling process.

The interest and fun a customer expresses with respect to assembling products is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.