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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

embarrassment

With five, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s motivation to hide his/her socially-relevant mistakes and weaknesses.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing such that it negatively affected one’s social value.

The degree to which a person believes that he/she would feel uncomfortable if seen purchasing a particular product is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure one's belief that he/she was being observed in a particular situation.

The general level of discomfort a person reports feeling in the presence of others is measured with six statements.

A person’s unease and apprehension about giving a particular product to a friend is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

Four, five-point unipolar items are used in this scale to measure one’s feelings of shame and remorse.

A person's anticipation of experiencing guilt-related feelings if he/she engages in a certain action is measured with three items.

This five item scale measures how much a consumer likes a brand and is glad to be seen with it.  Given the phrasing of the items, the scale makes the most sense to use when respondents are very familiar with the brand rather than it being new, proposed, or fictitious.

With four statements, this scale measures how strongly a person believes there are reasons that prevent use of a particular product.