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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

emotions

The scale measures a person’s anxiety that is based on some sort of a physical restriction being experienced.  Two versions of the scale are described that vary somewhat in the number of items and the response scales used.

With ten, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person is absorbed in an activity because it is the optimal challenge for his/her skill.

The degree to which something is viewed as sincere, friendly, and good-natured is measured with six, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

Five, eleven-point items are used to measure how much a person felt a sense of “going against the flow” by doing something different and experiencing resistance against someone or something in a particular situation.  

How positively or negatively a person feels about an object is measured with ten, five-point items.  Unlike many, if not most, measures of affect, the items in this scale are full sentences rather than semantic differentials.  The sentences are easily modified for a variety of objects.

The scale measures the degree to which a person who sold an item to a buyer experienced a feeling of completeness and closure due to the price that was negotiated.  Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Five Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person experiences a feeling of well-being with respect to a particular choice he/she has made.  Two slightly different versions of the scale are provided: one that allows for comparison of two decision options and another version that focuses on just one option.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a customer’s attitude regarding his/her susceptibility to being harmed because of the personal information collected by a company.

The degree to which a person has an emotional response to a stimulus which results from feelings of surprise and joy is measured with five, seven-point items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a consumer has a special bond with a certain product, especially of an affective and sentimental nature.