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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

emotions

The scale is composed of six, nine-point uni-polar items that measure one’s expressed level of unfavorable feelings.  While the scale appears to be amenable for use in a wide variety of situations, it seems to be best suited for occasions in which respondents have experienced something that did not go as well as expected.

The six item, seven-point scale measures the degree to which a person experiences feelings of anticipation such as excitement (at one extreme) or apprehension (at the other extreme) with regard to an upcoming event or activity.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures how lonely a person reports feeling at a point in time, especially as compared to “other people.”

The degree to which a person experiences negative emotions and thoughts for throwing away something in particular is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale may make most sense to use in contexts where the person is aware of alternatives for disposing of the item, particularly recycling. 

The scale employs eight, ten-point items to measure how stress-free and comfortable a person feels with respect to his/her financial condition.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person has an affective connection with a particular organization that is reflected in expressions of positive emotions.

A consumer’s belief that a product or set of products connote warmth and passion in some way is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The product, the producer, and the manner in which “love” is conveyed are not specified in the items themselves.

How much a person relies on his/her feelings in making decisions across situations is measured with seven, seven-point items.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person feels undecided and doubtful about something he/she has done such as choice that was made.

The tendency to worry about what other people think of oneself is measured with 12, seven-point items.