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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

emotions

Five, eleven-point items are used to measure how much a person felt a sense of “going against the flow” by doing something different and experiencing resistance against someone or something in a particular situation.  

How positively or negatively a person feels about an object is measured with ten, five-point items.  Unlike many, if not most, measures of affect, the items in this scale are full sentences rather than semantic differentials.  The sentences are easily modified for a variety of objects.

The scale measures the degree to which a person who sold an item to a buyer experienced a feeling of completeness and closure due to the price that was negotiated.  Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Five Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person experiences a feeling of well-being with respect to a particular choice he/she has made.  Two slightly different versions of the scale are provided: one that allows for comparison of two decision options and another version that focuses on just one option.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a customer’s attitude regarding his/her susceptibility to being harmed because of the personal information collected by a company.

The degree to which a person has an emotional response to a stimulus which results from feelings of surprise and joy is measured with five, seven-point items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a consumer has a special bond with a certain product, especially of an affective and sentimental nature.

The degree to which a person believes that he/she would feel uncomfortable if seen purchasing a particular product is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using five, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s emotional involvement in an advertisement.

The degree to which a consumer felt rushed and tense during a particular shopping trip to a store is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.