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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

emotions

The extent to which a consumer has an emotional bond and kinship with a particular brand is measured with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items the scale measures how much a consumer feels that he/she has devoted money, emotion, and other psychological resources to an object.

The scale has eight items that measure how much a person is bothered by things related to death and disconnected body parts.  (Most of the items have some connection to death and all but one of the items refer to human bodies or parts.) 

Twelve items measure the degree to which a person considers a wide variety of specific objects and situations to be repugnant, particularly if they are viewed as threatening one’s health.

The scale measures a person’s anxiety that is based on some sort of a physical restriction being experienced.  Two versions of the scale are described that vary somewhat in the number of items and the response scales used.

With ten, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person is absorbed in an activity because it is the optimal challenge for his/her skill.

The degree to which something is viewed as sincere, friendly, and good-natured is measured with six, seven-point uni-polar items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

Five, eleven-point items are used to measure how much a person felt a sense of “going against the flow” by doing something different and experiencing resistance against someone or something in a particular situation.  

How positively or negatively a person feels about an object is measured with ten, five-point items.  Unlike many, if not most, measures of affect, the items in this scale are full sentences rather than semantic differentials.  The sentences are easily modified for a variety of objects.

The scale measures the degree to which a person who sold an item to a buyer experienced a feeling of completeness and closure due to the price that was negotiated.  Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale.