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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

emotions

Four, ten point, semantic differentials are used to measure how positively or negatively a person feels about him- or her-self.

How much a consumer feels nervous and worried about buying a specified product is measured in this scale with three, seven point Likert-type items.

The level of stress and guilt a consumer feels about poor management of his/her money is measured using four items.

With six, five-point, uni-polar items, the scale measures feelings of stress and discomfort one has experienced in some context.

How much a person expresses experiencing an undesirable subjective feeling of social isolation is measured using twenty, four point items.

The scale uses three, nine-point uni-polar terms to measure how much a person feels under pressure and worried about something.  The scale is "general" in the sense that the three items composing the scale are not specific to any particular object or event and can be paired with properly written instructions for any number of contexts.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person was not certain of an event's ending when it was occurring and was interested to find out what would happen.  The items seem to be amenable for use with a TV program, an advertisement, an election, or a variety of other things as well.

The scale has six, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person does not like to receive personalized advertising because of the belief that the companies sending it are improperly using one's personal information.

How proud and self-confident a person feels is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a person likes a certain offer available to him/her and is considering accepting it is measured with three statements.