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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

emotions

The scale uses three, nine-point uni-polar terms to measure how much a person feels under pressure and worried about something.  The scale is "general" in the sense that the three items composing the scale are not specific to any particular object or event and can be paired with properly written instructions for any number of contexts.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person was not certain of an event's ending when it was occurring and was interested to find out what would happen.  The items seem to be amenable for use with a TV program, an advertisement, an election, or a variety of other things as well.

The scale has six, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person does not like to receive personalized advertising because of the belief that the companies sending it are improperly using one's personal information.

How proud and self-confident a person feels is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a person likes a certain offer available to him/her and is considering accepting it is measured with three statements.

The three, seven-point Likert-type items appear to measure more than just how mad a person is about something.  The emphasis of the items is on an extreme form of anger.  It was referred to as outrage by Gelbrich (2011).

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person experiences great pleasure in another person's misfortune that is believed to be deserved.

The degree to which a person feels sorry and personally responsible for something that has happened is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure a person's positive reaction to another person's nonverbal expression of emotion.

A person's negative reaction to the nonverbal expression of emotion by another person is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.