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emotions

The degree to which a consumer felt rushed and tense during a particular shopping trip to a store is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point uni-polar items are used to measure how much a person is described as being kind and friendly.  (Two versions of the scale are described, both having four items and three of them being in common.)

With four, nine-point items in a semantic differential format, the scale purports to measure a person’s emotional response from doing “good,” such as charitable giving and other prosocial behavior.

The degree to which a person feels disrespected and betrayed due to a company’s customer data activities is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of eight, nine-point Likert-type items that measure the pleasure one derives from recalling happy memories.

How a person feels (affectively) about his/her financial status is measured with four, nine-point semantic differentials.

Nine items are used to measure the tendency to accept one’s thoughts and feelings as they occur without evaluation or self-criticism.

The tendency for a person to notice and attend to thoughts and feelings having to do with physical aspects of his/her body is measured with six, seven-point items.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person’s tendency to notice and attend to his/her emotions and changing moods.

A person’s tendency to express and verbalize his/her thoughts and feelings is measured with eight items.