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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

emotions

The extent to which a consumer believes that a brand was part of an experience that he/she had is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The items connote an anthropomorphic view of the brand.

With two- and three-item versions, the scale measures a person’s belief that donating money to charities has a positive effect on one’s happiness.

Rather than focusing on guilt-related feelings, this scale uses four items to measure a person's cognitive appraisal of his/her failure to donate responsibly.

How much compassion a person feels for others is measured with seven-point unipolar items.  With the proper instructions, this version seems to be adaptable for use in a wide variety of situations.  Versions with five, six, and seven items are described.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure the level of fear that has been evoked by some stimulus.

Four, five-point unipolar items are used in this scale to measure one’s feelings of shame and remorse.

Four items with a seven-point response format are used to measure how much a person has been burdened by something that has happened to the point that it depletes his/her ability to deal with it.

Three, nine-point items measure the degree to which a person believes a particular experience was more than just enjoyable for the moment; it is viewed as having a larger impact on his/her life in terms of meaningfulness and fulfillment.

The degree to which a certain man is viewed as being in love with a certain woman is measured using three, seven-point items.  (The items appear to be easily adaptable for use with other interpersonal relationships as discussed further below.)

One's lack of close relationships with family members and a romantic partner from whom support and encouragement can be received is measured with ten, seven-point Likert-type items.