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empathy

A person’s tendency or ability to consider the point of view of other people is measured with seven items.

With four statements, the scale measures a customer’s belief that a particular service provider makes an effort to anticipate and understand his/her unique needs and expectations.

How much compassion a person feels for others is measured with seven-point unipolar items.  With the proper instructions, this version seems to be adaptable for use in a wide variety of situations.  Versions with five, six, and seven items are described.

The four, seven-point items composing this scale attempt to measure a person's trait-like tendency to feel compassion and/or sympathy for others, particularly those who are suffering.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the level of anger a person typically experiences upon learning that a person or group of people have been hurt in some way by others.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure a person's positive reaction to another person's nonverbal expression of emotion.

A person's negative reaction to the nonverbal expression of emotion by another person is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The tendency for a person's emotions to be adjusted, possibly subconsciously, to match those of another person is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of seven-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure how much a person believes he/she is affected by what others are feeling and experiencing.

The degree to which a person thinks the professors working for an educational institution are sensitive and concerned about their students' needs is measured with a five-item, seven-point Likert-type scale.