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employees

Three semantic differentials are used to measure whether a customer has more of a communal relationship or an exchange relationship with a business or employee.  In the scale, a communal relationship is informal and like a family whereas an exchange relationship is formal and purely transactional.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how much a person believes a particular party is at fault for an offense that occurred.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how strongly a person believes that an employee has engaged in behaviors to politely and attentively address a customer’s concerns (unspecified).

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that an employee has engaged in behaviors to actively and competently solve a customer’s problem.

Eight, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer’s belief that a particular company engages in behaviors that are thought to advance social good such as caring for people and the environment.

With four, nine-point items, the scale measures the extent to which a person believes that one or more employees of a company engaged in improper activity that deceived and harmed clients.

Four, nine-point items compose the scale which measures the extent to which a person believes an employee of a company has done something that is either immoral and damaging to his/her company or, at the other extreme, was honest and helpful.

Using a Likert-type response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person thinks that relevant others believe customers ought to be friendly to employees, especially to those at stores who provide service.  Items for both a four-item and a two-item version are described.

How much a customer believes that other people would approve if he/her acted unfriendly to a particular employee is measured by the scale.  The scale is useful when it is assumed that the actions of an employee could motivate customers to be unfriendly.  Items for both an eight-item and a five-item version are described.

This Likert scale measures the degree to which a customer of a store believes an employee was unfriendly based upon several verbal and non-verbal behaviors observed during a visit.  Items for both a nine-item and a three-item version are described.