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enjoyment

The degree to which a person considers something to have been interesting and fun is measured with three items.

The enjoyment a consumer experiences by being involved in programs offered by companies that give rewards for helping to recruit new customers is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The sentences are phrased such that they make most sense for those who have participated in such programs.

How much a person believes it would be enjoyable to post online regarding a particular product is measured with three, seven-point items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer expresses having an enjoyable experience with a purchased product he/has worked to create with the producer.

The scale measures the degree to which a person liked a particular experience he/she had.  Versions with two and four items are described.

How much a person liked a particular experience and thought it was fun is measured in this scale with four, nine-point items.

How much a person enjoyed a particular activity is measured with five, seven-point uni-polar items.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the degree to which a person believes a particular task in which he/she has participated was fun and interesting.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer’s judgement of a product’s quality and the enjoyment it would bring.  As written, the implication of some items is that the consumer has not experienced the product yet.  In that sense, the scale measures anticipated value.

The degree to which a person believes an information-related activity or object is enjoyable as well as worthy of exploration is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale may make most sense in a context where the object being assessed is a lesson, demonstration, or presentation.