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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

environmentalism

The scale measures a person's likelihood of cooperating with a particular organization to convince people to engage in composting.

A person's likelihood and interest in engaging in behaviors that will conserve paper, with an emphasis on refraining from use of disposable paper plates and cups, is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person is more nature-centered in his/her system of values, as opposed to human-centered, is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

One's ineffective, personal approach to dealing with an environmental threat, such as avoidance or wishful thinking, is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure a person's ability to recognize so-called "green products" and distinguish them from products that are not "green."

This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a consumer believes so-called "green products" are of high-quality and better than those that are not considered to be "green."

The degree to which a person holds the general belief that companies making so-called "green" products are dependable and competent is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a person believes environmentally-related problems have been exaggerated, particularly as it pertains to conservation.

One's attitude regarding the ability of an individual to have an effect on the environment, particularly in the form of reducing pollution, is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures the degree to which a consumer knows people who engage in pro-environmental activities, particularly recycling and buying "green" products.  To be clear, the scale does not measure a person's own environmentally-related thoughts or behaviors.