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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

equality

Using seven, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the attitude that there is inequality of social groups and some are superior to others.

The extent to which a person expresses beliefs supporting inequality among social groups is measured with sixteen, seven-point items.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure the extent to which a person believes at a particular point in time that social equality is important.

The scale uses five, seven-point items to measure a person’s belief that those close to him/her promote equality by helping the less fortunate.

Six, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that those in his/her important reference groups (friends, family, co-workers) would approve if he/she donated to charities to help improve social equality.

Five items with a 100 point response scale measure the strength of a person’s belief that his/her donation to a particular charity will help recipients, with an emphasis on improving their social status.

The importance a person places in his/her value system on social goals such as equality and cooperation is measured with four items.

Three, seven-point unipolar items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular brand possesses human-like characteristics associated with social and environmental concerns.

The degree to which a person believes in the inequality between those people with more power and those people with less.  Four, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

The acceptable level of power disparity among people in a society is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale does not measure a person's power nor the power inequality of a culture per se but rather a person's attitude about power disparity.