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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

equity

With six, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that the relationship he/she has with a service firm is based on the fulfillment of specified and quantifiable obligations in the short term.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer believes that what is received when buying a good or service is greater than what is given up. 

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a customer’s belief that a particular deal he/she has negotiated with a business provides equal benefits for both parties.

The degree to which a consumer is committed to a company and believes the company knows what he/she wants is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The scale uses three semantic differentials to measure how much a customer believes he/she was treated fairly by a business and as deserved.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure one’s belief that it is fair for visitors to give something to a website in return for access to free content.

A consumer’s summary attitude about the advertising of all types that he/she has been exposed to with respect to a particular brand is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A consumer's belief in a brand's superiority over competing brands and willingness to pay more for it is measured using four statements.

The degree to which a customer considers his/her insurance premiums to be fair and reasonable given the service received is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This scale uses four, nine-point semantic differentials to measure a customer's attitude regarding the fairness of his/her treatment in a purchase transaction compared to what other customers were thought to have received.  The emphasis is on the quality of the deal received relative to what other customers got.