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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

evaluation

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how appetizing and satisfying a person considers a food or beverage to have been that was tasted.

Composed of five questions and their respective seven-point responses, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement is trustworthy and unbiased.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer’s beliefs that he/she has insight into the characteristics, quality, and aesthetics of an object.

Nine, four-point items are used to measure how much a person engages in self-examination and introspection.

In this scale, four, seven-point semantic differentials evaluate how positive or negative a person’s attitude is toward a brand name.  A three-item version is also described.

The desirability of an object is measured with four brief statements and a seven-point Likert-scale.  The scale is “general” in the sense that the statements are amenable for use with a wide variety of objects.

A person’s chronic motivation to critically evaluate alternatives in order to improve the quality of decisions that are made is measured with twelve, six-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person redefined his/her role in a relationship due to some event.  The event is not stated in the items themselves but should be made clear to respondents in the context of the study or the instructions.

Using three, 10 point questions, this scale measures the degree to which a person thought about how he/she was being evaluated by a particular person with whom he/she had interacted.  In this case, “evaluation” is meant more in the sense of being “sized-up” or judged rather than formal testing or professional diagnosis.

The tendency to worry about what other people think of oneself is measured with 12, seven-point items.