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evaluation

Using three, 10 point questions, this scale measures the degree to which a person thought about how he/she was being evaluated by a particular person with whom he/she had interacted.  In this case, “evaluation” is meant more in the sense of being “sized-up” or judged rather than formal testing or professional diagnosis.

The tendency to worry about what other people think of oneself is measured with 12, seven-point items.

The extent to which a person relied on his/her emotions and intuition when evaluating an advertisement is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person’s attitude about the effect of a product on the environment and the propriety of buying the product is measured with four, seven-point items.  This product attribute is sometimes referred to as “greenness” or “environmental friendliness” meaning that it is either good for the environment or, at least, has less of a negative impact than conventional alternatives.

A consumer’s nutrition-focused attitude about a food product is measured using five, seven-point Likert-type items.  Because of the limitations of one of the items, a four item version is also described that can be used with a wider variety of foods.

How much a person likes a beverage based on the way it looks and tastes is measured with four, seven-point items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a customer’s belief that the food in a meal is of high quality and has premium ingredients.  The scale does not measure how the food tastes per se.

The tastiness of a specified food or beverage is measured in this scale with four, four-point semantic differentials.  The scale is general in the sense that it is an overall measure rather than assessing a particular type of taste such as sweet, salty, spicy, etc.

A person’s attitude about a particular object is measured using three questions with seven-point response formats.  The scale is general in that it could be used to evaluate organizations, people, or activities, among other things.  Further, the scale has more to do with one’s overall feeling rather than beliefs about specific attributes.

Four, nine-point uni-polar items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a particular pair of jeans is durable and well made.