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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

excitement

How much a person feels lively and spirited is measured with four, seven-point items.

The scale has six items that measure the degree to which a consumer believes a particular salesperson with whom he/she has interacted tried to build a rapport and an emotional connection between them prior to or along with discussion of sales issues.

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures how attractive and desirable a person is with whom one has romantic feelings that have not been expressed.

How stimulating and exciting something is (or is expected to be) to the senses is measured with three, nine-point items.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how important and fun shopping is to a person, in general.

The six item, seven-point scale measures the degree to which a person experiences feelings of anticipation such as excitement (at one extreme) or apprehension (at the other extreme) with regard to an upcoming event or activity.

The level of excitement and satisfaction a person believes he/she would feel if receiving a particular gift certificate is measured with four, ten-point items.

The degree to which a person believes that an ad is exciting and energetic is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

The degree to which a person reports feeling mellow or, at the other extreme, very energetic is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The extent to which a person paid attention to and was excited about the first half of a program is measured with eight, five-point items.  The scale appears like it could be used not only with a televised sporting event (as Moorman et al. 2012 did) but also a movie or TV program, and possibly other presentations and events (e.g., lectures, parades, debates).