You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

exercise

Five, nine-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure a person’s confidence that one will successfully manage his/her health by engaging in a certain activity.  (The activity can be specified by the researcher.)

With four, nine-point items, the scale measures a person’s belief that joining a particular fitness club will help reduce health risks.

A person’s intention to participate in a particular exercise at a certain level is measured with three, nine-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point items measure a person’s knowledge of and experience with a particular physical exercise.

The level of fatigue a person feels after engaging in an exercise is measured in the scale with three, seven-point items.

How much a person jogs and views it is as part of his/her identity is measured in this scale with four, ten-point items.

The scale measures a mixture of values, attitudes, and behaviors that indicate the degree to which a person treats health as more important than gratifying one's desires or vice versa.  Four, six-point semantic differentials compose the scale.

The scale measures how strongly a person believes that certain habits related to one's diet and physical activity eventually lead to poor health.

A 12-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree of control one believes he/she has over his/her health-related behaviors. The emphasis is on engaging in the behaviors rather than the outcome of those behaviors.

The scale uses three statements and a seven-point Likert-type response format to measure the extent to which something has helped a person want to exercise regularly. The motivating factor in the study by Nan (2008) was a public service announcement. However, the items seem to be amenable for use with other stimuli.