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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

expectations

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a consumer expects that if he/she does not take advantage of a current sale that it will be a mistake.

Four semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that if he/she hired a particular person for a stated job, the outcome would be good.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how certain a person is that a particular real estate agent will provide him/her with good service in finding a place to live.

This three-item, seven-point scale measures the level of pressure felt by a person when engaged in a particular activity.  The type of pressure is not stated in the items but is implied to be social pressure, most likely coming from other people who are waiting for him/her to finish the action. 

Four, 100-point items measure a person’s satisfaction with his/her current and future financial well-being.

A person’s belief that a company’s stock will increase in value is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes there are clear social norms that people should comply with in his/her country is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

How long a person felt a period of time was when waiting for something to happen is measured with three, nine-point semantic-differentials.

The scale has three, nine-point items that measure how much a company’s ratings are as expected compared to those of other companies. 

How stimulating and exciting something is (or is expected to be) to the senses is measured with three, nine-point items.