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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

expectations

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person believes that he/she will feel unhappy and powerless if there is a failure to experience what was expected with regard to a product choice decision.  The items are phrased such that the focus is on making the choice based on how the options vary on one critical product attribute.   

The degree to which a person has positive expectations about his/her future is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert items that measure how much a person expected to feel good if he/she scored many points in a game.

Three, ten-point items are used in this scale to measure how well a customer’s experiences with a brand compare to his/her expectations and the ideal product.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer expresses having an enjoyable experience with a purchased product he/has worked to create with the producer.

A customer’s belief that a service agent’s performance was good and, in fact, better than expected is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures a customer’s belief that the performance of a particular store or company met his/her expectations and that a good decision was made.

How much a person anticipates that if a particular meal is eaten then he/she would feel bad and sorry about it afterwards.  A three- and a four-item version are discussed.  Each item has its own unique semantic differential and a 101-point sliding scale.

A customer’s beliefs regarding the anticipated quality of a company’s branded goods or services (before he/she has experienced the product) is measured with three, ten-point items.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person still wants to eat a familiar brand of a product immediately after having tried some of an unknown brand.