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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

expectations

With eight, six-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much at a particular moment in time one’s motivation is to be around people and situations in which he/she has high certainty of what to expect.

The four, seven-point items in the scale measure how much a person anticipates before making a product choice that he/she will feel personally responsible and unhappy if a poor option is selected.  More specifically, the items are phrased such that the focus is on making the choice based on how the options vary on one critical product attribute. 

A person’s belief that a particular service will be good is measured in this scale with four, seven-point items.

How much one’s uncertainty about something is determined to some degree by randomness is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.  The scale is amenable for use with a wide variety of issues.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person believes that he/she will feel unhappy and powerless if there is a failure to experience what was expected with regard to a product choice decision.  The items are phrased such that the focus is on making the choice based on how the options vary on one critical product attribute.   

The degree to which a person has positive expectations about his/her future is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert items that measure how much a person expected to feel good if he/she scored many points in a game.

Three, ten-point items are used in this scale to measure how well a customer’s experiences with a brand compare to his/her expectations and the ideal product.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer expresses having an enjoyable experience with a purchased product he/has worked to create with the producer.

A customer’s belief that a service agent’s performance was good and, in fact, better than expected is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.